Does selling the same product on three different domains look spammy?

I manage 3 websites that sell the same products across 3 domains. Each site has a different selling approach, price structure, target audience, etc. Does Google see this as spammy or black hat? Josh K, Dallas, TX Have a question? Ask it in our Webmaster Help Forum: www.google.com Want your question to be answered on a video like this? Follow us on Twitter and look for an announcement when we take new questions: twitter.com More videos: www.youtube.com Webmaster Central Blog: googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com Webmaster Central: www.google.com

12 thoughts on “Does selling the same product on three different domains look spammy?

  1. Spammy for sure. We have that problem with competitors of a client of mine. The company creates a new business name and then sells the same products.

    There has been in special cases that a separate domain is needed so the manufacturer can refer people to a page that doesn’t have competitors on it. In this case we have a landing page and then the links go to that specific section on our site. This way we can continue to focus on one site.

  2. Spammy for sure. We have that problem with competitors of a client of mine. The company creates a new business name and then sells the same products.

    There has been in special cases that a separate domain is needed so the manufacturer can refer people to a page that doesn’t have competitors on it. In this case we have a landing page and then the links go to that specific section on our site. This way we can continue to focus on one site.

  3. So how exactly should you test different strategies to follow which works best.
    There are many criteria to test (demographics,point of views, graphical appeal, etc) while In the end, discard what doesn’t work without being penalized.

  4. Seriously if I package the same identical product in three different ways to target different demographic groups how is that spammy?

    Say I got one luxury site where you have a 24/7 customer service line and express delivery with higher price ofc and one which would be your basic webshop without anything special with a reasonable pricetag and one budget site with a low price but very bad customer terms. That would be spammy? I mean they need to be on different domains. Don’t get this at all.

  5. How I wish this was the best place to ask follow up questions of this video… I manage several dozen sites which all offer similar products. Each site is templated and each site sells virtually the same product (cars). They may have different names, domains, and physical addresses, but what you describe here suggests that this could still be considered spammy if they’re too similar. Where’s the limit of similarity, then?

  6. A new Interactive Transcript button. Something I’ve been asking for a long time. I hate watching videos , and love skimming articles.
    Thank You.
    Matt, I’d give you a hug, but I’m covered in Panda poop :-)

  7. Hi Matt. I think it’s a really common issue especially when different brands are run by the one parent company or is text is ‘prescribed’. Take as an e.g. the ‘High Performance Electric Pump’ product listings on two UK websites, Homebase and Argos – they both contain the same text (I am not affiliated with either site). Would both sites look spammy, or one get penalised for duplicate content, or would they both look fine in Google’s eyes? Would it be better if the text was varied on each site?

  8. The problem is that there is not the human intervention to allow three sites to legitimately operate within the Google algorithm without being automatically de-listed or at least severely penalized.

    Take for instance how Matt references three sites a not a problem but yet we find in our case we are being penalized.

    We have three sites. Two specifically targeting different industries with our products and one actually selling to the public / consumer based on features that can help the disabled

  9. To continue… Where the problem arises is that there are detailed Feature Lists, database driven and ranked in order of importance.

    But because these Feature lists are extensive, it’s perceived by the Google Algorithm as duplicate content. Even though they are three distinctly different sites, serving three different demographics. And only one is an actual purchasing option to the public.

    Google needs figure a better way to address such conditions.

  10. I would say this is a tough question. There’s thousands of websites that sell the same products. Looking at the motorcycle industry as an example; i can name 50 sites selling the same helmet with at the same price; same pictures and same description. I can’t see Google looking at it as spam.

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